Movies that make me cry: Finding Dory

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

It’s almost not even worth it writing this one because of course Finding Dory made me cry. It’s like Pixar is actually Monsters Inc., but instead of discovering that they can turn laughter into a reusable energy source, they’ve figured out how to do the same with our tears.

Because every Pixar movie has made me cry in some way or another.

So really, it’s no surprise that the sequel to a fish movie that made me cry would also make me cry. I missed seeing it in theatres, so Netflix it was. I was pre-warned by my friend that I’d need a box of tissues near the end, but about halfway through the movie I started to get cocky.

I won’t cry this time. I wrongly thought to myself as Ty Burrell-as-a-beluga made me laugh again. Maybe I don’t cry as much at these kinds of things as I used to.

And by “used to” I mean last month.

But then Dory was lost again. And she trying to remember who she was looking for. And she saw the kelp and went to the kelp. And she saw the sand and went to the sand. And then she saw a shell and remembered she liked shells.

Then she saw another shell.

Then another one.

Then I gasped. And without warning, two dams broke and tears comically poured down my face, down my neck and all over the front of my t-shirt.

Shells.

Rows and rows and rows of shells. Lined up by her parents who knew that one day she’d come back and one day she’d follow one of the many paths of shells they had been laying out every day since she went missing.

And now, for the foreseeable future, every time I think about that one scene, I’ll just break down crying. If you see it happening, just do me a favour and politely ignore me.

Movies that make me cry: Fundamentals of Caring

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

Every now and then, you find a gem of a movie.

Some movies masquerade as gems, when in actuality they’re just dull rocks that make you really bored. Some are dirty rocks that leave you feeling gross. Some are hopeless rocks that leave you feeling, well, hopeless. Some masquerading gems are too weird to comprehend. Some seem to be going well and then they rip your heart out (I’m looking at you, Frank!)

And then Netflix offers you a buddy movie that’s sweet and funny and, yes, heartbreaking, but it’s also redeeming. It doesn’t leave you drowning in a pit of tears. I mean a pit is involved in the movie, but it’s not a pit of tears. Actually it’s kind of a pit of piss, but it’s quite sweet, you know, once you’ve watched the movie.

Paul Rudd is of course lovely as Ben. Not just because he’s had my heart since his Clueless days and he astounds me with his agelessness, but because he brought a comfortable realness to the role that showed, as his character says, a decent guy just trying to help people out.

Craig Roberts is not someone I was previously acquainted with, so he has no claim on my heart like Mr. Rudd does, but he was so great as Trevor, a young man who voluntarily lives a small life with an uneventful routine, only seeing things through his TV, assuming his Duchenne muscular dystrophy is limiting his life. That is until Ben shows him otherwise – through a week-long road trip to see a few of those hideous roadside attractions Americans seem to love so much.

Their relationship is wonderful and quirky and sweet. But if I’m being honest, that’s not what made me cry. Actually, quite the opposite. Their relationship is what made me laugh out loud several times in the form of everything from a chuckle to a guffaw.

No, the thing that had me crying was when you find out what happened to Ben’s son. I’m shaking my head even as I write this. That’s what had me crying.

Movies that make me cry: Away We Go

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

John Krasinski and Maya Rudolph. Not enough people know about the brilliance of this movie. As if it didn’t have you at John and Maya, there’s also Jeff Daniels, Catherine O’Hara, Allison Janney, Jim Gaffigan, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Chris Messina – need I go on?

All right, so I know just because the cast sounds amazing, that does not an amazing movie make. Just look at Rise of the Guardians – not the owl movie, as I originally suspected. It’s an animated flick boasting the likes of Chris Pine, Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin and Jude Law. Rise of the Guardians may be great for kids who think they’re about to watch owls, but it’s not a real tear-jerker. It’s quirky and strangely cute, but it doesn’t leave you a mess in the same beautiful way Away We Go does.

Away We Go is like a diamond in the rough. The kind of diamond you look at and end up curled in the fetal position with an emptied box of tissues dialing your mom’s phone number to tell her you love her.

A bearded Krasinski and a preggers Rudolph (as opposed to a pregnant Rudolf) are faced with the decision of where to live when his parents, curly-haired O’Hara and bespectacled Daniels, decide to move to Antwerp two months before the baby is to be born. Do they live in Arizona near her crazy ex-boss, Janney, and her unhinged family and a short drive from Rudolph’s sister? Do they move to Wisconsin to be near his childhood hippy friend Gyllenhaal with her seahorse-obsessed husband? Do they live in Montreal with their college friends, Messina and baby-in-a-bar girl from Sweet Home Alabama, who have a perfect adopted family? Do they live in Miami with his brother who’s recently become a single dad, Mark Brendanawicz from Parks & Rec?

There are a couple points that make me bawl. First, when her and her sister are bathtub shopping in Arizona and they both climb into a showroom tub so her sister can pretend to wash her hair like their mom used to before she died. That whole scene just kills me and the halted conversation they’re having by talking about it but not really talking about it just teems with so much pain I can’t even begin to imagine.

The other scene is when they’re in Miami and he is trying to track down his brother’s runaway wife who left her husband and her daughter. He’s pacing back and forth on a trampoline at midnight trying to track down this woman who he says tore his brother’s family apart and broke that little girl’s heart. And then she climbs onto the trampoline – while very much pregnant in the comfiest muumuu I’ve ever seen – and for the first time, you find out why they’ll never get married and it starts to break your heart and open the floodgates of your tear ducts. And then they exchange vows. The sweetest, most wonderful, most tear-gland-splicing vows I’ve ever seen in a film. Even as I type this I’m getting choked up.

Krasinski: Do you promise to let our daughter be fat or skinny or any weight at all? Because we want her to be happy, no matter what. Being obsessed with weight is just too cliché for our daughter.
Rudolph: Yes, I do. Do you promise, when she talks, you’ll listen? Like, really listen, especially when she’s scared? And that her fights will be your fights?
Krasinski: I do. And do you promise that if I die some embarrassing and boring death that you’re gonna tell our daughter that her father was killed by Russian soldiers in this intense hand-to-hand combat in an attempt to save the lives of 850 Chechnyan orphans?
Rudolph: I do. Chechnyan orphans. I do. I do.

It’s so sweet!

And then the final scene, well, the last twenty minutes or so because the final scene happens right after the trampoline scene so the tears are already a-flowin’. They go home. And throughout the movie the director Sam Mendes has been cutting between the travel scenes with “AWAY TO ARIZONA” or “AWAY TO MONTREAL” and then this scene just says “HOME” and the tears start going. And then they pull up and see the tree with all the plastic fruit on it! My face is a mess. And then they slowly drive up the overgrown driveway and see the house – the wonderful, beautiful, magical house with chipped paint and old windows and a chain-link fence, and I start to lose it again. And then they silently, all so silently, pull open the door and it’s huge and monumental and I’m a complete mess. I’m not even watching the movie right now and I’m a mess. I need to lean away from my computer lest I drown my tears.

And then they sit. And it’s perfect. And… excuse me. I have to go watch this movie right now, but first I have to make a Costco run for bulk tissues.

Movies that make me cry: The Light Between Oceans

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

I realized now that I forgot to write about this particularly heart-rending film.

If you’ve read the book, I applaud you. My friend read it and then warned me that I may not be able to get through it in one piece. So instead I just watched the movie and honestly, I barely got through that. But reading and spending so much more time in the grief and sorrow of these characters would have been too much to handle.

I once saw the book in a bookstore after I’d seen the movie and decided to flip to the last chapter, where all the grief and sorrow of the story culminates into one moment, and I had to hold back tears in the bookstore aisle.

If you’ve never read the book, never watched the movie and never even seen the trailer, I assume your heart is still in one piece.

The Reader’s Digest version is as such: Tom is a WWI veteran who decides to live in an isolated lighthouse far off the coast of Australia in order to deal with his demons. The few times he does visit the mainland, he meets and falls in love with Isabel. The two move to the lighthouse together to start their adorable life and adorable family.

Except they don’t.

She miscarries, twice, and shortly after the second loss, a rowboat washes ashore with a crying baby and a dead man. In her grief, she sees it as fate giving them the baby they lost, and to please his grieving wife, Tom agrees.

A couple years later, they go back to the mainland and Tom finds another grieving woman who lost her husband and baby in a freak boating accident. No bodies were ever found. No closure ever had for her. Tom tries to comfort her by sending a note that her baby is taken care of and her husband is gone, but that stirs up more problems and through a series of truly heartbreaking events, the child is eventually forced out of the arms of the only parents she’s known and into the arms of her birth mother. Tom and Isabel grow old and childless, and a week after Isabel dies, a young woman shows up at Tom’s house. It’s the daughter that was taken from them. After all those years, she remembered the few years of happiness and love she had with them when she was a child.

*cue the kind of ugly crying where tears stream down your face and make your hair stick to your neck*

It’s beautiful, but heartbreaking. Everything about it is beautiful, if you can call sorrow beautiful.

And stars Michael Fassbender and Alicia Vikander are too good to leave you unaffected. The story is tragic enough, but their acting makes it so personal and real.

Basically, if you want to be broken by a tragically beautiful story, watch or read The Light Between Oceans.

But only if you think you can handle it.

Movies that make me cry: Arrival

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

If you haven’t watched this movie and you haven’t heeded my warning above, I beg you, please stop reading and go watch it.

No, seriously.

If you’re still reading, what is wrong with you? This movie is one that needs to be seen and experienced so that you too can sit in a movie theatre with your jaw hanging open in a state of shock.

Just, go away.

For those who have seen it and agree that it’s tear-worthy, I welcome you.

Remember that moment? That moment you realize? That moment when she says “I don’t have a child” and then your brain explodes?

And then when you realize she kept going in life. She married him. She had a baby with him. She raised that daughter of hers knowing, completely knowing, what would happen.

She agreed to fall in love with a man knowing her marriage would fall apart. She agreed to fall in love with this child knowing she’d be taken away from her too soon.

It’s tear-worthy because it shows that knowing how something will end doesn’t negate everything that happens until then. If anything, it can make you love more deeply and enjoy every moment so much more.

She knew her daughter would die, but she also knew her daughter would live. She’d get to play with her and tickle her and make her laugh and fight with her and hug her and put her to bed and watch her sleep. She knew her daughter would have a life, however short, and she’d be part of every moment of it.

A lot of this is what I processed after the movie ended. As I sat in my car and then sat on my couch in silence, going over what I had just watched and trying to come to grips with the profundity of it.

Because this little blog post doesn’t even begin to mention the whole other side of that movie, with language and humanity and what it means and how poignant it all is.

If you did continue reading when I told you not to, now it’s time for you to watch the movie so you actually know what I’m talking about.

Movies that make me cry: Me Before You

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

Duh.

Because you’d have to be a heartless, robotic monster not to.

I don’t need to explain why this movie made me cry because if you’ve read the book, you know. If you’ve seen the movie trailer, you know. If someone has explained the plot to you, you know. If you just listen to that one Ed Sheeran song that plays in the trailer, or that new Imagine Dragons song, you know.

I will say this, never before have I been in a movie theatre when, during quiet parts, I could hear muffled sobbing from every filled seat. It was quite a unifying experience. Just a bunch of women and a few men giving into all the feels.

Excuse me while I reach for a tissue… I just remembered it again.

Movies that make me cry: Brooklyn

Not all movies make me cry. I’m not necessarily a major weeper, but if a movie or a TV show strikes just the right chord, then my tears are a melody of all my feels.

That being said, there are some movies that make me cry more than most – and make me cry every time I watch them. This is one of those movies. (Beware: there are obviously spoilers.)

If you have absolutely no idea what movie I’m talking about, that’s completely understandable.

The first time I heard about Brooklyn is when my friends and I accidentally ended up at its red carpet premiere in London on our way to see Suffragette. I mean we didn’t end up on the red carpet. We ended up with a crowd of people pushed up against a metal barricade wondering who everyone was waiting for. And then we saw the giant posters and caught a glimpse of Saoirse Ronan and stood around casually for a bit longer wondering if we would see Domhnall Gleeson.

That Irish ginger stole our hearts.

I blame About Time. I mean, before he was Tim, I watched him in a hilarious sketch where he plays a women’s clothing store employee who not-so-quietly recreates X-Men scenes under his breath (watch it, it’s perfection), but his character in Richard Curtis’ cry-fest was adorable. And then his interviews are equally adorable. So when we realized he was going to be in a seemingly adorable little film about an Irish girl moving to America and being caught between two homes, we knew we had to find it.

The only problem is this adorable little film really is quite little, as in indie, as in was only showing in select theatres that we couldn’t find for months. Cineplex kept toying with us about the release date and then finally I saw that it was going to be in theatres on Christmas Eve and we knew we had only a short window to watch it before it disappeared forever.

And we were not disappointed.

It’s a perfectly lovely film. It’s honest and sincere and simple. And Domhnall is of course endearing (much more endearing than his character in the latest Star Wars I might add). But this movie made me cry because of Saoirse.

She perfectly captures the turmoil of homesickness and loneliness and culture shock as she tries to come to terms with living apart from her mother and sister and you’re rooting for her to feel at home, to feel some kind of belonging. And she meets a nice Italian guy and he’s just lovely to her. And it all seems to be going well.

And then you see her mother go into her sister’s room and find her dead on the floor. And Jim Broadbent comes to Saoirse’s work with a sad look on her face. And her tears become your tears as you sit in a theatre on New Year’s Day with a bunch of people whose average age is several decades more than your own and you do the casual cheek brush like you weren’t crying, you just had an itch.

But you were.

You were definitely crying.